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RESOURCES
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EMPOWERING INFORMED CONSENT CARD

In May 2017 members of the DTES community started meeting at the Hives for Humanity Bee Space to have conversation about how to ensure that community ethics are a respected part of the process of cultural production. A resource card was produced from these conversations. The project was supported by SFU’s Vancity Office of Community Engagement and by UBC Learning Exchange.

"DON'T READ US THE BOOK WE WROTE"
Telling the story of the DTES Community Research Ethics Workshop (Mini-Documentary)

In May 2022, members of the CREW alongside university and community collaborators were proud to release a mini-documentary film that features interviews with key members and supporters of the CREW project to tell its story. Produced by UBC PhD student Janina Krabbe and filmed/edited by Duncan Ris, this 17:41 minute short film provides an introduction to the idea of "community ethics", the work taking place in Vancouver's DTES neighborhood to advance an empowered vision of community-centered research ethics, and the rationale for a "Community Research Ethics Workshop". 

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Bees 1_edited_edited.jpg
EMPOWERING INFORMED CONSENT CARD

In May 2017 members of the DTES community started meeting at the Hives for Humanity Bee Space to have conversation about how to ensure that community ethics are a respected part of the process of cultural production. A resource card was produced from these conversations. The project was supported by SFU’s Vancity Office of Community Engagement and by UBC Learning Exchange.

Marginalized communities often attract more than their share of research. Too often, this research benefits researchers disproportionately and leaves such communities feeling exploited, misrepresented, and exhausted. The Downtown Eastside (DTES) neighborhood of Vancouver, Canada, has been the site of multiple public health epidemics related to injection drug use as well as the site of much community-led resistance and struggle that has led to the development of cutting-edge harm reduction interventions (e.g., North America’s first supervised injection facility, Insite) and a strong sense of community organization. This background has made the DTES one of the most heavily researched communities in the world. Amidst ongoing experiences of unethical or disrespectful research engagement in the neighborhood, a collaboration between local academic researchers and community representatives developed to explore how we could work together to encourage more respectful, community-responsive research and discourage exploitative or disrespectful research.

THE RESEARCH RHYME
BY JULIE CHAPMAN

The Manifesto is a way to create -

Reciprocity, it's never too late

 

When research isn't done in respectful ways -

Communities and people won't want you to stay

 

If there's a study that's going to be done -

Respect and dignity should be number one

 

Don't start a project if the research may hurt -

Re-traumatizing people, won't make it work

 

Keep in mind if you are visitors down here -

Many have failed, when supporting our peers

 

We are co-authors and part of the CREW -

Striving for improvement in research we do

 

Sharing our lived experiences through media and live -

To ensure future research will help all survive

 

The End